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Civil Engineering

Chemical Engineering

CIVIL ENGINEERING: CE

CE-103 Wastewater Treatment for Constructed Wetlands
This seminar will discuss emerging forms of wastewater treatment the offer a low cost alternative to traditional designs. These new forms of wastewater treatment are effective in both warm and cold climates. Applications of this technically include treatment of sewage from small communities, landfill leachate and sludge stabilization.

CE-104 Principles of Steel Structural Design (Part #1)
This seminar will cover the following items:
Design of Tension Members: analyzing a truss internal forces and designs the truss tension members.
Design of Beams:   Analyze the bending moment diagram on a beam.  Design  laterally supported beams and  laterally non supported beams, using the flexure  formula
Design of  Connections:
Design of Riveted Connections: design of riveted connections under concentric and eccentric loads
Bolted Connections: Design of Bolted connections under concentric and eccentric load
Welded Connection Design:
Design of compression members:  analysis of column compression formulas, analysis of several end conditions, theoretical “K” factors versus modified “K” factors. , design several compression members, design of built up sections.
End Plate Design: Definition of end plate, functions, stresses analysis of end plate, and design of end plate.  

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CE-106 Biological Wastewater Treatment
This seminar is an introduction to microbiology, chemistry and biological wastewater treatment. Topics include a review of microbiology and chemistry, public health and safety, and environmental and nuisance problems related to biological waste treatment. The class will cover the fundamentals and application of these principles to the treatment of wastewater's with specific attention to activated sludge and fixed film processes. Techniques for optimum process control and treatment will be reviewed.

CE-107 Advanced Wastewater Treatment
This seminar will present some of the latest technologies being employed to remove pathogens and nutrients from wastewater. Pathogens such as giardia lamblia and nutrients such as phosphorus and nitrogen can be removed via micro-filtration, membrane bio-reactors, UV disinfection and electrolysis as polishing unit. Basic calculations for sizing and specifying these treatment devices and applications of the treatment devices on actual treatment facilities will be presented as well as what was learned from the experience of installing, operating and maintaining these systems.

CE-108 Storm Water Management; Control & Regulation
This seminar will present common methods of storm water management, erosion and sediment control and the general requirements for storm water discharges from construction sites. Storm water resulting from rain of melting snow that does not soak into the ground runs off into waterways. As it flows, this water gathers a variety of pollutants such as nitrogen and phosphorus. These elements can promote an overgrowth of algae and depleted oxygen in the waterways that is harmful to other aquatic life such as Eutrophication. Normally, storm water is not treated by sewage or wastewater treatment plants, but rather by on-site controls through the use of best management practices (BMPs). This seminar will presented basic calculations as well what was learned from the experience of management practices.

CE-110 Reinforced Concrete Design Part # 1
- (Columns, Beams and Footings)

This seminar will discuss the principles of reinforced concrete design by determining the forces acting on the structure, using standard methods of structural analysis and by proportioning all structural material economically which can address its safety and serviceability requirements.

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CE-111 Earthquake Resistant Structural Design
Buildings suffer major damages when shaken by a strong earthquake. It is important to study the seismicity of the area and obtain a representative ground motion time history before starting the structural design. The presentation will cover how earthquake happens, how ground motion travels in soil and rock, ground motion amplification, dynamic soil-structure interaction and methods used to make civil engineering structures earthquake resistant. Lessons learned from past earthquakes and current design practices will also be presented.

CE-112 Fluid Dynamics for Piping Design
Fluid dynamics is an important discipline that has applications that range from the study of the large-scale properties of weather systems to the design of the engineering equipment in a variety of plants and factories. This seminar introduces the various aspects of fluid dynamics using first principles and provides the preparation to solve practical engineering flow problems. The basic ideas of fluid dynamics, including water waves, high-speed flow of air and gases, channel design, piping evaluation, fluidization and the theory of the Equation of Motion are covered. The seminar is interactive and uses solved problems and illustrations to demonstrate the main concepts. Case studies are included to help develop and reinforce the understanding of the material presented

CE-113 Reinforced Concrete Part #2 (Retaining Structures)
This seminar will discuss different types of earthen and reinforced concrete retaining wall structures. The presentation will generally discuss the lateral loads and stability of retaining walls. There will be design examples of reinforced concrete retaining walls utilizing T-Walls where their construction and load characteristics will be analyzed.

CE-114 Earthquake Induced Ground Failure: Liquefaction
Liquefaction has been responsible for significant damages in numerous earthquakes around the world. Earthquake shaking can cause the water pressure to increase to the point where the contact pressure between soil particles is near zero, and therefore causes the particles move easily with respect to each other. The presentation will cover the characteristics of earthquake ground motion, why the liquefaction occurs, how the liquefaction hazards can be reduced through soil improvement and liquefaction resistant structures, and the current research efforts on liquefaction related studies.

CE-116 Fundamentals of Ground Modification Techniques for Earthworks
 In traditional geotechnical engineering practice, the natural ground conditions at a site are accepted for what they are and a structure or earthwork designed to perform acceptably under those conditions. Increasingly, it has been found more cost-effective to alter the ground conditions prior to or during construction and design based on the improved ground conditions. This is especially true when earthworks are involved. The overall technology for this is called ground modification or improvement and in many cases can also be applied to existing structures to improve or upgrade their current or future performance. This seminar will provide an introduction to and overview of ground-modification technologies with an emphasis on applications involving earthworks such as landfills, embankments, slopes, and water-resources structures (dams, dikes, and levees).

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CE-117 Environmental Site Assessment (Part #1)
This seminar will review the origins and evolution of an “All Appropriate Inquiry” (AAI) for an environmental site. There will also be a review of what constitutes a “Clean Site” and the determination of how clean is clean. Discussions concerning the “Soil Cleanup Objectives and NYCRR Part 375” and the standards of practice for USEPA and the ASTM will be presented. The seminar will conclude with a discussion on the facts and limitations of past and present site inspections as well as a review of the regulatory database.

CE-118 Design of Light Weight Fills Using EPS Geofoams
Expanded polystyrene (EPS) is the material of choice worldwide for many geosynthetic functional applications requiring the use of geofoam. The most-common use of EPS-geofoam is in ground-modification as a lightweight-fill material. This is due to the fact that EPS has a density (unit-weight) only about 1% to 2% that of normal earth materials thus allowing virtually ‘weightless’ construction. Yet despite its low density, EPS, if specified and manufactured to the appropriate quality, can directly support roads, railways, airfields, and even small buildings and bridges. This seminar will provide an introduction and overview of EPS with a focus on its use as a lightweight-fill material. Use will be made of state-of-art research results from past and ongoing National Cooperative Highway Research Program (NCHRP) studies into the use of EPS-geofoam in road construction. The findings of this research are applicable to many other applications in addition to roads. The seminar instructor, Dr. John S. Horvath, P.E., was and is a co-principal-investigator in this NCHRP research and has consulted on numerous EPS-geofoam applications worldwide, including the highly successful and innovative use on the Boston ‘Big Dig’. Dr. Horvath has also written the only English-language book on geofoam, “Geofoam Geosynthetic”, and is acknowledged as the world’s leading civil-engineering expert on the subject.

CE-119 Soil Mechanics Part #1 (Hydrological Characteristics of Drainage Systems)
This seminar will encompass a general discussion and overview of soil classifications and behavior and then discuss unique conditions and such as the establishment of ground water surface elevation and techniques of dealing with hydrostatic and hydrodynamic forces. There will also be a review of laboratory porosity tests, field applications and case studies of on site drainage of storm water and septic systems.

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CE-120 Soil Mechanics Part #2 (Soil Preparation for Foundations)
This seminar will discuss the following issues: The nature of the ultimate structural supporting soil material and actual capabilities. Also to be discussed will the factors affecting soil strength and / or weakness on the desired structural systems. Numerical examples will be provided that duplicate compaction test results. There will a discussion on shear test results that include a qualitative understanding of soil bearing capacity with its compliance to building code requirements. The presentation will conclude with calculations that will determine lateral soil pressure (Including active, passive, and at rest soil pressures) as well as examples of soil settlement parameters.

CE-121 Failure Analysis of Water Main Breaks
The different water main materials that are used by cities in the U.S. will be described including cast iron, ductile iron and steel ranging in diameter from 6 inches to 96 inches. The different modes of failure would be shown with photos including, longitudinal splits, circumferential breaks, localized galvanic corrosion and stray current corrosion. Fractography would be explained as a method to determine the origin of failure of each break. Methods to determine the cause and source of failure would also be shown for all the types of breaks. Specifications used to order the different water mains will be given both for 100 years ago and presently to minimize the breaks.

CE-122 Failure Analysis of Bronze Valves and Shaft Caps
Stress-corrosion cracking was the failure mechanism method of most of the bronze valves and shaft caps in New York City and upstate New York. A detailed explanation will be given to explain this type of failure. Laboratory testing that was used to corroborate the cause of failure will be demonstrated. Scanning Electron Microscopy and metallography will be explained in the failure of each type of copper alloy and for each structure that failed. Methods used to prevent the structures from failing in service, without changing the alloy will be illustrated. Photographs of all the failures will be shown.

CE-123 Failure Analysis of Materials & Structures (Part #1)
Materials, and particularly metals, leave behind telltale evidence that allow the determination of the root cause of a structural failure provided a systematic procedure is followed. During the first half-day of this double-session seminar, the basics of what leads to brittle versus ductile fracture of metals will be described. Failure due to single-event overload, cyclic fatigue, as well as wear and corrosion are all discussed and examples are shown to teach the key observations that can and should be made. Rather than focus on individual structural examples (e.g., bridges, pressure vessels, etc.), the underlying phenomenology is emphasized.

CE-124   Failure Analysis of Materials & Structures (Part #2)
This seminar will discuss in detail the general procedure for conducting a systematic failure investigation, along with the many possible sources of part, structure, or system failures. Extending the principles that are used with metals with great success, the complexities associated with analyzing failures in composites will be explained.

CE-125 Using GIS for Civil/Environmental Engineering Projects
This seminar will be an introductory course to Geographic Information Systems (GIS). It will discuss how such information can be gathered from the internet and how the same information can be used for custom applications. The specific application areas that will be covered will include, but not be limited to, transportation, water resources, land development, and environmental. Other applications related to municipal applications will also be reviewed.

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CE-126 Design of Shallow Foundations
This seminar will cover the salient features of the analysis and design of shallow foundations. It will focus on the vertical stress increases in the soil mass caused by the foundation load. Included in the analysis will be calculations of soil settlement and its allowable bearing capacity. Also discussed will be foundations that require soil reinforcement.

CE-127 Design of Deep Foundations
This seminar will cover the salient features of the analysis and design of deep foundations. It will focus on the types of piles used in terms of materials and strength and discuss methods of estimating the required length of the piles and its relationship to load capacity. The calculations will be based on the Meyerhof’s Method of analysis which assist in the determination of frictional resistance and pile settlement.

CE-128 Building Codes for New York City Pt # 1
Properly performed inspection of materials, and testing are shown as well as additional provisions in Chapter 1 of Title 28 of the Administrative Code. Included are various Special Inspections which have already begun to replace Controlled Inspections on July 1 of 2008. The Registration of a selected Inspection Agency will be walked through to make it effective January 1 of 2009. The required Final Certifications of a variety of Technicians is listed and the methods for properly obtaining them no later than July 1, 2009 are illustrated. The methods for complying with insurance requirements for Professional liability and NY States Worker’s Compensation are described. Following these requirements will result in a Special Private Inspection Agency Electronically Registered with Accredited Special Inspectors.

CE-129 Building Codes for New York City Pt # 2
Specifically, this seminar explains the new TR1 (Technical Report Statement of Responsibility). Included are special inspection items such as structural steel, welding, concrete, soils, underpinning and many more. Photographs of this being performed are included. Also TR1s issued in the Certificate of Complete Inspection is described. Both TR1s are signed, dated and sealed by the NY State Licensed Professional Engineer or Registered Architect, assuming all the responsibilities described in the TR1.

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CE-130 Permanent & Temporary Soil Retaining Structures
This seminar serves as an introduction to soil cuts and will discuss the nature and objectives addressing such conditions. There will be a review of the types of soil cuts and the methods of stabilizing them. A qualitative understanding of the problems and solutions will be presented. Such as:
Loads acting on a retaining structure/wall
Modes of failure
Types of lateral soil pressure
Types and effects(s) of surcharge
“AASHTO” design requirements and recommendations
Practical considerations in the investigation of maximum soil cuts without sheeting requirements as per “OSHA”, utility trench sheeting design requirements, highway traffic surcharge, water tight versus non-water tight retaining structures, and change of load configurations.
Practical approaches to resolve real problems will be formulated.

CE-131 Practical Solutions for Soil Retention & Slope Stability
This seminar will discuss the practical features of retaining walls with regards to its physical structure and details of drainage considerations. There will also an analysis of the type of soil pressure that must be incorporated for practical design. The soil retaining capability of sheet piles will be reviewed where areas such as cantilevered sheet piles, anchored sheet piles, trench sheet piles, and interlocking block systems will be discussed. A discussion on the qualitative analysis and practical considerations of slope stability will ensue. It will cover land availability and use, boundary protection, and surface protection. The effects of water on soil stability systems such as that caused from ground water and seepage, storm water and soil wash off, water front soil slope protection, and green surface protection will be presented.

CE-132 The Operation of NYC Sewage Treatment Plants
This seminar will assist the participants to better understand the basic operation of a New York City Sewage Treatment Plant. The course will touch on the sewage collection system and how it conveys the sewage the plant. It will include Preliminary, Primary,    and Secondary treatment of sewage. Discuss the treatment and disposal of Bio-solids. There will also be a discussion of the major plant equipment such as sewage pumps, compressors, boilers, waste gas burns, digesters, thickeners, and the use and operation of centrifuges.

CE-133 Environmental Site Assessment (Part #2)
A presentation of the basic requirements and methods for conducting an investigation to determine if a site is contaminated. 
1) Determining the need for the investigation: An overview of Phase I assessments.
2) Purpose & Objectives of a "Phase II" investigation: is there or isn't there a problem?
3) Regulatory Requirements and guidance for site investigations.
4) Defining "Areas of Environmental Concern" requiring investigation.
5) Laboratory analytical requirements and quality control: "Keeping the numbers real"!!
6) Soil sampling means and methods
7) Groundwater sampling means and methods
8) Surface water & sediment sampling means & methods.
9) "Other" sampling activities
10) Data Evaluation: How does site's data compare to "clean"?
11) Reporting
12) The need for additional investigation(s)
This seminar will focus on the fundamentals of a site investigation to determine whether there is an environmental problem. There will be a review of the regulatory requirements and guidelines for site investigations. There will be a discussion of the “Areas of Environmental Concern” that require investigations. A review of the standard analytical laboratory requirements and quality control measures will ensue with regards to the sampling of soil, groundwater, surface water and sediments. Finally there will be an analysis of what makes a site environmentally clean.

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CE-134 Design Innovations for Special Structures
This seminar will cover special construction aspects such as how to add three or more floors onto an existing one-story facility and how to substantially upgrade roof structures to support vehicle parking. Unique building foundations will be investigated such as the “Raft Foundation” for Lefrak City as unique design solutions for retaining walls and garage-offsets from a building layout. Also to be discussed will be how to design vehicle and semi-tractor trailer truck ramps.

CE-135 Environmental Aspects of LEED for Existing Buildings (Part #1)
For Existing Buildings LEED projects, points can be obtained for environmental compliance in the Materials & Resources (MR) and Indoor Environmental Quality (IEQ) categories. MR includes developing waste management policies and performing waste stream audits. MR credits can be obtained for choosing IAQ compliant products and by performing a universal waste inventory. IEQ includes outside air testing, removal of hazardous materials and construction indoor air monitoring. IEQ credits can be obtained for monitoring formaldehyde, particulate matter (PM10), total volatile organic compounds (TVOC), 4-phenylcyclohexene (4-PCH), carbon monoxide (CO).

CE-136 Environmental Aspects of LEED for Existing Buildings (Part #2)
Energy auditing is a building science inspection that assesses how a building works as a system, why some buildings fail, and how to use the latest building science technology to help resolve heating, cooling, base load and air leakage problems. By using a performance-based approach, an assessment can be performed of interrelated building issues and provide clients with a more comfortable, safe, durable and energy-efficient building. Training will review inspection procedures and analysis of a building's energy use factors and costs, such as insulation values, occupancy schedules, lighting levels, and records of utility and fuel expenditures. Training will include identification of specific energy-conserving opportunities (ECOs), along with the cost-effective benefits of each one. The completed study provides the building owner with a thorough and detailed basis for deciding which ECOs to implement, the magnitude of savings to be expected, and the energy conservation goals to be established and achieved in the energy management programs.

CE-137 The Process of “Performance Rating” for New Buildings
(Part # 1)
This seminar will address the various standards for benchmarking how environmentally responsible (green) a building’s design is, how the energy saving may be accomplished and how the indoor air quality may be improved. Meeting or exceeding benchmark levels rewards the builders and gives homeowners’ confidence that their home is durable, healthy, and environmentally friendly. Specifically this presentation will focus on Sustainable Site, Water Efficiency, Energy and Atmosphere where Architects and Engineers can learn about the overall concepts of sustainable buildings and also learn the step by step procedures for earning the specified pre-requisite and credit points for obtaining the certificate, as outlined by Leadership in Energy and Environment Design.

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CE-138 The Process of “Performance Rating” for New Buildings
(Part # 2)

This seminar will address the various standards for benchmarking how environmentally responsible (green) a building’s design is, how the energy saving may be accomplished and how the indoor air quality may be improved. Meeting or exceeding benchmark levels rewards the builders and gives homeowners’ confidence that their home is durable, healthy, and environmentally friendly. Specifically this presentation will focus on Materials and Design, Indoor Environmental Quality, and Design Innovations, where Architects and Engineers can learn about the overall concepts of sustainable buildings and also learn the step by step procedures for earning the specified pre-requisite and credit points for obtaining the certificate, as outlined by Leadership in Energy and Environment Design.

CE-139 Virtual Design and Construction Fundamentals
The seminar will focus on Virtual Design and Construction (VDC) as a tool which will enable us to build a project “virtually” on a computer before constructing and operating it in the real world. To do this, Virtual Design and Construction computer models are built, using information from various sources including GIS, CADD, survey and laser scanning to represent the project and its components in a coordinated and consolidated virtual model. This model can then be reviewed and evaluated by, and shared among project teams including owners, contractors, designers and engineers, construction managers, stakeholders and operators. It allows teams to find and fix costly design and construction errors before they happen on the construction site. The paper will also cover the many benefits and lessons learned while using VDC on projects across the globe.
Owners, engineers, construction managers will be able to use VDC for:
Visualization for stakeholders during design
Construction phasing and logistics planning
Development of schedule/budgetary options
Integrated schedule management between multiple contractors
Class detection between multiple juxtaposed contracts
Improve the shop drawing process.

CE-140 NYC Bldg. Code (# 3): Building Use, Heights, and Areas
This seminar will place emphasis on the identification of various occupancies and types of construction in order to determine the heights and areas of buildings. Incidental use versus mixed use fire separations will be discussed. We will introduce the various uses from assembly through utility occupancies. We will practice height and area calculations. We will discover how to increase areas and heights using automatic fire sprinklers.

CE-141 NYC Bldg. Code (# 4): Fire Resistant Rated Construction & Means of Egress
This seminar will cover the calculations of occupant loads including the capacities of doors, corridors and stairs with a synopsis of fire resistance. We will discuss how to increase the size of buildings with fire walls. We will cover exterior walls, fire walls, fire barriers, shaft enclosures, fire partitions, horizontal assemblies, and opening rotectives. We will introduce prescriptive and calculated fire resistance tables. We will cover egress and corridor width and maximum distance of travel. Ramps and stairways will also be covered.

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CE-142 Inspection of Short Span Bridges (Part #1)
This seminar will encompass a discussion of bridge types and inspection of super- structure and substructure of short span bridges. We will discuss bridge deck inspection and testing for evaluation and recommendation for repair or replacement. It will include inspections of deck support system consisting of beans, girders and trusses and the inspection of abutments and piers.

CE-143 Inspection of Short Span Bridges (Part #2)
This seminar will discuss the following:
-A study of road and highway run off and the evaluation of the adequacy and functions of drainage system to prevent road flooding and embankment erosion.
-A study of flood frequency requirements that concern the capacity of water way opening under bridges which will include an investigation of the effects of scouring on water way approaches, on adjacent abutments, and piers.
-An investigation of the soil near the vicinity of abutments, piers, and retaining walls or wing walls to determine the over all stability of bridges.

CE-146 Traffic Control (Part #1)
This Seminar will discuss the fundamentals of traffic signal control concepts and configurations based on the latest documents such as Highway Capacity Manual 2010, the Federal Manual on Uniform Traffic Control Devices (MUTCD), and other related documents. Part 1 will discuss the following topics: Traffic signal warrant study; Traffic signal control concepts and definitions; Number and locations of signal faces by approach; Visibility, and positioning of signal faces; Signal indications for left turns; Protected and permissive modes of operations, Pedestrian timing requirements etc from an isolated intersection prospective.

CE-147 Traffic Control (Part #2)
This Seminar will discuss the fundamentals of traffic signal control concepts and configurations based on the latest documents such as Highway Capacity Manual 2010, the Federal Manual on Uniform Traffic Control Devices (MUTCD), and other related documents. Part 2 will discuss the following topics: Signal coordination concepts for arterial and street systems, Signal coordination issues involving two way streets, and work zone traffic control.

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CE-148 Operation of a Bio-Solid Dewatering Facility
This seminar will discuss the fundamental operation of a typical NYCDEP Bio-solids Dewatering facility. Additionally the presentation will include a discussion of what bio-solids are, where it comes from, and what environmentally beneficial uses it has.

CE-149 Inspection of Girders Supporting Light Rail Trestles
(Part #1
)
This seminar shall consist of the fabrication of plate to girder that comply with the New York City 2008 new Building Code requirement in Chapter 17 for Structural Tests and Special Inspections. Inspections were performed on the premises of the fabricator's shop. Three(3) 4 foot by 4 foot and 34, 42 and 48 foot long girders were fabricated from FCM (Fracture Critical Material) steel plate. Inspection included the computer scheduled plasma cutting of the plates and maintaining it's original heat identification. Various welding techniques were witnessed including GMAW, SAW and GMAC with different approved weld procedures. Assembly included temporary tack welding of webs to flanges and diaphragm insertions. Inspection of girder alignment and grinding before top flange welding was critical in the fabrication.

CE-150 Inspection of Girders Supporting Light Rail Trestles (Part #2)
This seminar will cover the Repair, Heat Treatment, Cambering & Painting during the NDT (Non-destructive testing) of welds which included magnetic particle, ultrasonic and radiographic inspection that required mandatory testing. Witnessing the repair of the welds that failed by cognizant personnel was also necessary. Post weld heat treatment was observed throughout the time period required. Cambering was performed with a combination of clamping the girders in certain sections and heat treated in those sections only. Wheel abraders performed the sandblasting and was witnessed to assure the surface preparation was achieved. Primer painting was also witnessed and measured in the dry form to confirm that all sides of the girder meet the minimum thickness.

CE-151 Safety Inspection of Arterial Bridges (Part #1)
This course is intended to give an overall view of items and work involved in bridge safety inspection report in NY State. The NYS DOT bridge safety inspection method is presently among the most common and well-known method of bridge safety inspection in the world. Most of work (98%) is done in the field, logged in the hand held computer, and submitted to owner, as soon as it is finalized.

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CE-152 Safety Inspection of Arterial Bridges (Part #2)
This course is continuation of CE-151, and will contain additional information and sample photos of bridges throughout New York City. These photographs will offer better insight into bridge safety inspection. The bridges are mostly arterial bridges, which include some very large bridges (East River Bridges, Harlem River Bridges) and some smaller pedestrian bridges.

CE-153 Environmental Site Assessment (Part #3A)
Once a site has been determined to have contaminations issue[s], investigations to fully define the problems and evaluate “where we go from here” are needed. This seminar provides an overview of the means and methods utilized to define the nature and extent on soil and groundwater contaminants, along with the utilization of a site’s data to define what has to be done and target approaches to achieve site clean-up. Topics include:
· How we got here, overview of Phase 1 & Phase 2
· Purpose[s] of Investigation[s] & Area of Concern [AOC] Definition
· Regulatory Overview (e.g. Federal, State, and Community Involvement)
· Specific AOC Requirements (e.g. UTSs, Soils, Groundwater, and Vapor Intrusion)
· Media specific requirements and laboratory
· QA/QC
· Data Reduction & presentation
· What data is used for (e.g. Delineation, Risk Assessment, and Alternative Cleanup Evaluations)

CE-154 Environmental Site Assessment (Part #3B)
After a site’s contamination has been defined and the need for clean-up established, there are various techniques that are used to implement the cleanup actions. These may range from establishment of simple engineering and institutional controls to intense site activities followed by long term O&M. This seminar provides an overview of approaches and the technologies actually used to “make a site clean for its intended use”. Topics include:
· How we got here; Overview of Phases 1, 2 & 3
· Purpose of Remedial Action[s] (e.g. Cleanup Objectives, Current and Future land uses, Deed Restrictions & Notices, and Engineering Controls & Long Term O&M)
· Regulatory Overview (e.g. Federal, State, and Community Involvement)
· Contaminant Types & Options (e.g. Organic, Inorganic, Nuclear, and Mixed)
· Dig it up & Make it Go away
· Immobilize & Contain
· Destroy it: Either In-situ or Ex-situ (e.g. Biological and Chemical)
· Thinking for the Long Term: Operations, Maintenance & Monitoring

CE-155 NYC Building Code, Fire Protection Systems (Part #A)
This seminar will include a brief history of where the NYC fire protection code requirements were and why they were updated to its present status. This will lead to a thorough discussion of chapter # 7 of the NYC code manual that concerns itself with Fire-Resistant-Rated Construction. Also included in the presentation there will an investigation of fire protection systems such as automatic sprinkler systems and sand pipe systems.

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CE-156 NYC Building Code, Fire Protection Systems (Part #B)
This seminar will continue the thorough discussion of chapter # 7of the NYC code manual the concerns itself with Fire-Resistant-Rated Construction where the topics to be covered will include:
• Occupancy Classifications and Design Criteria
• NFPA Codes as modified for NYC
• Various methods of calculations and computer programs available
• Fire Alarm and Detection Systems
• Smoke Control Systems and Enclosures
• A discussion of Appendix Q of the code that summarizes changes made to the IBC codes for NYC

CE-157 Analysis and Design of Sheet Piles (Part #1)
This seminar will introduce and discuss the salient design procedures to implement sheet piles. The presentation will encompass sheet pile wall construction methods with attention given to cantilever sheet piles driven in soil with predominately clay deposits and with those that are predominately sand. There will be a review of pressure diagrams as well as an investigation of special procedures required for cantilever walls in sandy soils. Anchored sheet piles will be discussed as well as the moment reduction for anchored sheet pile walls.

CE-158   Analysis and Design of Sheet Piles (Part #2)
This seminar is a continuation of CE 157 and will focus on areas such as Free Earth Support methods for the penetration into clay soils and Fixed Earth Support for the penetration into sandy soils. Other areas that are discussed will be the utilization of bulkheads and the types of anchors that should be selected. The holding capacity of anchor plates and beams in sandy soil will be reviewed. Additional comments will be made concerning the implementation and importance of Tie Backs and Brace Cuts.

CE-159 Analysis and Design of Sheet Piles (Part # 3)
This seminar is a continuation of the previous dissertations on Sheet Pile design. There will be a discussion of anchored sheet piles as well as an investigation of the moment reduction of for sheet pile walls. There will be an analysis of the lateral pressure on sheet piles at rest. This will include the conditions that present active pressure on sheet piles and those components which are relegated to offer passive pressure.

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CE-160 Analysis and Design of Sheet Piles (Part # 4)
This seminar will discuss the implementation and importance of tie backs and brace cuts in sheet pile design. There will be a review of the pressure envelope presented to sheet piles and the design of various components to adapt to the envelope constraints. An investigation of bottom heaving will be conducted. In addition there will be a review of the stability of sheet piles as well as the forces that contribute to lateral yield. Case studies will be included.

CE-161 Inspections of Dams and Related Hydraulic Structures Pt #1
Dams in general are considered as large structures since they have several elements and purposes attached to their function. Presently there are about 82,000 dams in the United States. The rate of dam construction has been decreasing since 1970. However, the existing dams need continuous checking and monitoring. In general the services of multi-disciplinary engineers needed for design and construction of dams, are probably the same genre of experts   needed for safety inspection in a dam project. It is safe to say; that the trend of dam construction in a country or in any continent is a reverse function of   industrial stage of that region .The more advanced a country is the less there is a need for dams. Dam construction still needed is regions plagued by water shortage and flood control. This puts India and Africa on top of the list.  In 1906 City of New York built the Croton dam for water consumption of its resident, it was called the tallest and biggest dam of its time.

CE-162 Inspections of Dams and Related Hydraulic Structures Pt #2
Afternoon session is continuation of morning course, with emphasis on safety concern. In this session, both structural and other safety concern will be review and discussed. Presently all the medium to large dams have staff of maintenance personnel trained for handling all the tasks year round. This includes civil/ mechanical/ electrical/hydrologist and others with previous private sector experiences blended with some high school graduates willing to learn and be trained for future events. In the imminence of catastrophic event, the service of additional consulting engineers such as geologist (and geo -technician) will be required.

CE-163 Seismic Restraints of Non-Structural Systems (Part #1)
Upon completion of this seminar the participant will have a deeper understanding of how to determine a project’s “Seismic Design Category”. The theory and practice of determining a project’s “Seismic Design category” and examples of determining a project’s “Seismic Design Category”. Additionally the participant will be introduced to determination of seismic forces and seismic restraint of non-structural components, equipment and systems.

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CE-164 Seismic Restraints of Non-Structural Systems (Part #2)
Upon completion of this seminar the participant will be able to determine which non-structural equipment, components and / or systems require seismic restraint and how to calculate the seismic forces acting on such equipment. The participant will also be introduced to seismic restraint of floor mounted and suspended equipment. Finally the participant will be presented with a study of seismic damage and how to avoid it.

CE-165 Highway Engineering (Part #1)
This seminar will cover the initial factors in highway design. Topics will include: Highway planning including roadway width, right-of-way width and, other factors; Survey requirements; Highway cross-section design including side slopes, retaining walls, normal profile, super elevation, maximum roadway grade, sight distance, horizontal curves, vertical curves and, sight distance.

CE-166 Highway Engineering (Part #2)
This seminar will cover additional factors in highway design not included in Highway Engineering I. Topics will include: Drainage including catch basins, drainage pipe, culverts, swales, leaching basins, recharge basins; Roadway design including cross-section, sub-base evaluation, test borings, pavement depth, pavement type, pavement composition; guide rail and culvert rail; Roadside development; Street lighting; Traffic control devices.

CE-167 Structural Steel Design & Codes for Small Buildings (Part #1)
This seminar will present an overview of AISC Specifications and Local Codes and discuss Issues pertaining to the design of a low/mid-rise building. Loads and applicable design criteria will be discussed as well as the various aspects of design requirements.  There will be a thorough review of the steps needed to create a small building structural model for computer analysis and visit applicability of Code provisions while building that model.  We will explore techniques for preliminary design of structural members which form the initial member size inputs.  We will follow up reviewing the results of a typical analysis.  We will close the morning session with a Quiz and a Question time.

CE-168 Structural Steel Design & Codes for Small Buildings (Part #2)
This seminar will review results of an analyzed building model for upgrading the member sizes where required and selecting uniform sizes where applicable. We will also try to evaluate the design from a steel fabricator's point of view such as economy, efficiency, and speed.  Then we will review points of coordination - and contention - between an architect and an engineer - esthetics vs. indispensable design needs, that sometime bedevil the life of a construction project.  We will review different type of Connections that may be designed for a given node.  We will summarize the entire design process outlined during the whole session.  We will close the afternoon with a Quiz and a Question time.

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CE-169 Arterial Intersection and Traffic Signal Design
This Seminar will discuss Preliminary Traffic Signal Design techniques for determining the number of lanes required for an acceptable Level of Service for each approach lane to a signalized intersection. A set of “Rules of Thumb” will be used to determine the lane configuration for each approach prior to starting the actual intersection design. The design engineer will be able to determine the actual number of lanes required for left turns, thru movements, and right turns, as well as to estimate the length of queue for each approach. Examples will explain the methods used to determine an acceptable Level of Service.

CE-170 Arterial Intersection and Traffic Signal Design and Workshop
Attendees of this Seminar will review the Preliminary Traffic Signal Design techniques and methods learned in CE 169 (Part 3), and then apply them to intersection designs.  The attendee will determine the number of lanes for each approach to an intersection, as well as the Level of Service for each approach lane, including the queuing length for each lane, and its required vehicle storage length.  

At the conclusion of this course, the student will be able to determine:
* * The number of thru lanes required;
* * The number of left turn lanes and their storage length;
* * If the travel way can accommodate the proposed number of lanes; and
* * The use of “Rules of Thumb” to aid in capacity analysis and intersection design.

CE-171 Principles of Structural Steel Design (Part #2)
This seminar will focus on the following areas:

The design of tension and compression members, the design of beams, the design of bolted and welded joints, the design of composite sections, and the design of brackets with eccentric loads. Practical examples will be presented and discussed

CE-172 State Codes for Shallow Foundation Design
This seminar will focus on the NYS/NYC code requirements related to the general types of shallow foundations and modes of failure due to the soil. The soil bearing capacity will be developed using tabulated data from the NYS/NYC codes and using Terzaghi’s Theory. The discussion will also include isolated footing design requirements, a loading analysis, and bearing pressure calculations. Numerical examples of typical shallow foundations will be covered that will include features of ACI 318-08.

CE-173 State Codes for Deep Foundation Design
This seminar will discuss the theory, design, and load testing that comply with the NYS/NYC codes for deep foundations. There will be an introduction of terms and definitions as related to pier and pile foundations as per the building codes. There will be a review of the advantages and disadvantages of using drilled shafts as compared to driven piles. The codes related to loading requirements will be discussed as well as special/additional requirements for deep foundations. The design theory and calculations will focus on the load transfer mechanism and its qualitative and quantitative  relationships to load testing curves. There will be discussions on modes of failure, estimations of pile bearing capacity, and the lateral soil pressure effect. Also to be  discussed are the negative skin friction and the ACI requirements that address pile cap punching shear. Case study examples will be included.

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CE-174 Traffic Engineering (Part #1)
This seminar will cover techniques and methodologies applied to collect traffic data as well as scientific and statistical techniques used to analyze and evaluate/validate data. Topics will include: traffic engineering studies involving volume (control and coverage counts), speed, travel time, delay, accident, and parking data; intersection count and delay studies, cordon and screen-line counts.

CE-175 Traffic Engineering (Part #2)
This Seminar will cover fundamental concepts in the operations of signalized intersections. The HCM methodology involving the design and timing of pre-timed traffic control signals will be presented. Signal operations issues involving capacity, allocation of times for vehicular and pedestrian phases, and consideration of intersection geometry will be discussed based on real world examples and appropriate solutions to the problems will be provided.

CE-176 Codes for Highway Guide Rails, Bridge Rails, & Street Lighting Design (Pt. #1)
This seminar will cover the determination of the need for guide rail and guide rail design.  Topics include categories of roadside obstacles, treatment options, general criteria for guide rail installation, guide rail design procedures, and types of guide rail and their characteristics..  

CE-177 Codes for Highway Guide Rails, Bridge Rails, & Street Lighting Design (Pt. #2)
This seminar will cover bridge rail design and street lighting design.  Topics include criteria for determining the type of bridge rail to use, how to modify existing non-conforming bridge rail, transitioning bridge rail to guide rail, determining the proper illumination and the pole spacing necessary and other street lighting criteria that need to be considered when designing street lighting

CE-178 Suspension Bridges; Concepts, Overview and Trends
Suspension bridges, as one of the pioneers said, “It is a combination of structural engineering, mathematic and art, without eschewing the financial aspect of job”. Indeed it is a major financial enterprise for improving the condition of transportation infrastructure (arterial) with the technology of civil and structural engineering.

Early suspension bridges were  built with eye bars  at beginning of  19th century in US & UK simultaneously until John A. Roebling    built  the  Brooklyn Bridge  with his  own  manufactured  high  strength cable. From this date on the construction of suspension bridge became a viable alternative for large span bridge crossing.  In today’s one tier suspension bridges the inverted trapezoid box girders are among the best alternative for large span bridges crossing.

CE-179 Analysis of Failed, Collapsed and Upgraded Bridges
This seminar will investigate failure incidents for the major bridges in US and through the world. There will be a review of the knowledge gained from these failures and how they contributed to evolution of innovative ideas leading to successful bridge design. This seminar will review the causes of these failures (partial failure and total collapse) with some examples of how existing bridges were upgraded to prevent these failures.

CE-180 Composite Section Steel Design
This seminar will address composite section steel design for shored versus un-shored construction. It will cover the effective flange width and shear connectors. There will be discussions of the deflections in composite beams utilizing formed steel a deck as well as the design of continuous beams with composite sections.  The seminar will conclude with a review of columns with composite sections.

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CE-181 Steel Plate Girder Design
This seminar will address the AISC requirements for steel plate girders, their flexural strength, their shear strength, and the bearing stiffness. This discussion will be accompanied by numerous design examples.

CE-182 Forensic Engineering Analysis for Litigation (Part #1)
Various types of forensic analysis that played a key role in litigation are discussed. Some cases were settled and others went to trial. Included in the forensic failures were a fractured hair pin in a  sandwich, stray current on cast iron water mains and copper water service pipe, a ventilation/drainage grating, steel gas mains, damage to a Fire Engine, faulty "metal" decorative trees and corrosion failure of water mains. Methods for performing the forensic engineering analysis including photography and laboratory analysis, if needed, are described. Personal injuries resulted from some of these failures.

CE-183 Forensic Engineering Analysis for Litigation (Part #2)
Methods to become an expert in forensic engineering analysis are outlined. The forensic failures included a cat food can, a sewer main installation, a bronze impeller, scaffolding, Motion Control cabinet legs, faulty set screws, a gear box on a backhoe, a steam heat exchanger and a large water main. Most of the forensic failures are illustrated with photographs and drawings. Three of these failures caused fatalities and others severe injuries.  A long deposition from one of the cases brought new forensic analysis work at  later dates from the opposing interrogating attorneys.

CE-184 Principles and Design of Concrete and Clay Masonry (Pt. #1)
The objective of the course is to provide Design and Construction inspection parameters and best practices for concrete and clay masonry so that these functions can be performed with increased effectiveness

The course addresses unforeseen or uncontrolled expansion, contraction or gross movement in the horizontal or vertical directions both in and out of plane including control joint, expansion joint and movement joint locations.

Also covered is cavity wall construction, moisture control, lintels and shelf angles, mortar types, hot and cold weather best practices, soft joints, flashing, hybrid masonry, efflorescence, water repellants and tests, wall and floor tile, terrazzo and autoclaved aerated concrete units.

CE-185 Principles and Design of Stone Masonry
The following course covers modern thin veneer stone masonry including the following:

  • Facade soiling and prevention
  • Moisture and dampness control
  • Stone Masonry types (ashlars, rubble, etc.)
  • Masonry anchors
  • Mortars
  • Stone types
  • Consideration when choosing the stone
  • Creative options
  • Face types
  • Manufactured Stone
  • Chip repair
  • Micro-thin and natural thin panels
  • Terra Cotta panels

CE-186 Ethics for Practicing Engineers (Part #1)
This seminar will review ethical obligations of licensees as outlined by the New York State Department of Education and licensure. Examples will be given from recent actions by the department against individuals along with analysis of where the licensee went wrong, and what could have been done to lessen risk and mitigate failings. Differentiations between mis-practice, malpractice and non-feasance will be discussed as well as methods to avoid each. A review of administrative actions against licensees will be undertaken so that participants will know how to respond to achieve the best results. A discussion of record keeping and proper practices will also afford participants an opportunity to improve procedures and hopefully better respond to inquiry if any.

CE-187 Ethics for Practicing Engineers (Part #2)
This seminar will review ethical obligations of licensees with an emphasis on other administrative bodies and their internal Licensing actions, and particularly actions against Professional Engineers and architects. A review of changes in Department of Building Requirements and new code changes in documentation and job filing procedures with the City of New York will be undertaken. Requirements of other agencies including the Fire Department and DEP will be discussed. A review of Federal Regulations as they relate to the practice of Engineering and Architecture as well as a discussion of contracting with Federal and State agencies will be undertaken. Discussion of legal liability to clients, statutes of limitation, inovation and the drafting of contracts and retainer agreements.

CE-188 Analyzing the Effects of Various Types of Structural Loads (Part #1)
This seminar will start with examining the historical development of Design Loads through various Codes and ASCE-7 document. It will discuss any special aspects of design loads we take for granted, including but not limited to, dead loads, live loads, snow and thermal loads, wind loads, soil lateral loads, rain loads, flood loads, earthquake loads, miscellaneous and special loads. There will be additional discussion on less frequently used loads in day to day small structures or beam/column design, for example, Soil Lateral Loads, Earthquake Loads and Special Loads..

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CE-189 Analyzing the Effects of Various Types of Structural Loads (Part #2)
This Seminar will build upon Basic Loads Seminar by analyzing various methods of load distribution on structures, approximate methods for load distributions, analyzing point loads versus distributed loads for the same loading conditions. It would also review historical developments of various load combinations and how some of these have evolved over a period of time. It will also analyze load combinations considered mandated and absolute minimum required by various codes for the safe analysis of structures. Review of specially generated loads and their combinations will also be discussed.

CE-190 Engineering Economics for Infrastructures Projects & Contracts (Pt #1)
How will major infrastructure projects be delivered in the current economic environment? By addressing issues such as these this seminar will provide the practicing engineer with the basic skills needed to intelligently evaluate complex engineering projects and to procure capital facility services. Part -1- of a two-part series will cover the following topics: 1.) overview of engineering economics; 2.) Institutions and public-private partnerships and 3.) Project delivery and financing versus the engineering break even point. The seminar’s principal intent is to develop skills to: (a) derive a delivery strategy for a capital facility based upon a projects technical characteristics and owner objectives and (b) design the procurement of a capital facility so that it preserves owner interests and attracts private participation. Case studies of major infrastructure projects utilizing alternative project delivery methods such as design-build-operate or build-operate-transfer are discussed and used extensively in this instruction.

CE-191 Engineering Economics for Infrastructures Projects & Contracts (Pt #2)
How will major infrastructure projects be delivered in the current economic environment? By addressing issues such as these this seminar will provide the practicing engineer with the basic skills needed to intelligently evaluate complex engineering projects and to procure capital facility services. Part -2- of a two-part series will cover the following topics: 1.) Project feasibility versus engineering complexity 2.) Economic evaluation and 3.) Global and elemental risk analysis including design, construction and financial risks. The seminar’s principal intent is to develop skills to: (a) derive a delivery strategy for a capital facility based upon project technical characteristics and owner objectives and (b) design the procurement of a capital facility so that it preserves owner interests and attracts private participation. Case studies of major infrastructure projects utilizing alternative project delivery methods such as design-build-operate or build-operate-transfer are discussed and are used extensively in this instruction.

CE-192 Review of Basic Wooden Beam Structures
This seminar covers the design of simple wood beams by starting with the laws of equilibrium and fundamental definitions. The relative strength of structural materials (wood, steel & concrete) will be discussed. There will be explanations, calculations and exercises for reactions, shear, moment and deflection. The differences between uniform and point loading will be discussed.

CE-193 Wood Tied Roofs vs. Cathedral Ceilings
Tied roofs typical to gable roofs will be contrasted to cathedral ceiling design. There will be explanations, calculations and exercises for gable, cathedral ceiling and cantilevered beam loading. We will discuss how to design the top of a cathedral ceiling wall. There will be a discussion of hip roofs and tray ceilings. The impact of prefabricated greenhouses on the top of stick frame walls will be discussed..

CE-194 Reinforcing Steel and Concrete Inspection (Pt.1)
The objective of this course is to increase your understanding of:

  • Concrete proportioning
  • Concrete reinforcing design & corroded steel repair
  • Reinforcement placement, including field changes & methods of determining proper lap splices for normal & seismic conditions
  • Concrete placement, both on land & under water
  • Concrete consolidation & finishing
  • Concrete curing

These will be taught using in-class student exercises & examples from actual field conditions as well as ACI suggested details.
The course presents practical information about field inspection of concrete reinforcing, including descriptions of markings used to identify bar size, material type, & producing mill. Substitution of different bars and different spacing is also discussed.
Bar placement and proper lap dimensions is reviewed for various footings, columns, wall, beams, stairs and slabs. Reinforcement ties are included as well as bar placement for utility openings and other holes in these structures.

CE-195 The Underpinning of Foundations (Pt. #1)
The course deals withthe temporary and permanent support to existing foundations in order to provide additional depth or to increase the soil’s bearing capacity. The intent is to support the structure w/o failure and w/o settlement that would be detrimental to its integrity or function. Many types of underpinning are reviewed and methods of analysis are presented under a variety of soil and foundation conditions. Construction processes are also discussed in detail based on specific projects.

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CE-196  Residential and Commercial Building Inspections (Pt 1)
This seminar will discuss the principles of commercial and residential building inspections and the particular requirements that a licensed professional engineer or registered architect needs to consider. Topics include understanding professional licensure versus home inspector certifications, business formation, insurance requirements, non-destructive visual examination versus destructive testing, wood destroying insect evaluation, environmental testing (e.g., air quality, mold, lead, asbestos), tools of the trade, and various types of report.

CE-197 Residential and Commercial Building Inspections (Pt 2)
This seminar will continue to discuss of the principles of commercial and residential building inspections as performed by a licensed professional engineer or registered architect and will focus particularly on the scope of an inspection, common deficiencies that are encountered, and recommendations for remediation or repair. Topics include evaluating the various components or systems of a home, such as the general site, building exterior or façade, roof, heating, ventilation, and air-cooling system, electrical power distribution system, plumbing system (water supply and sanitary/ storm/ combined sewer systems), foundation and structure, building interiors, fixtures, and appliances.

CE 198 Vertical Transportation Machines: (Elevators, Cranes, Derricks, & Hoists) Pt.1
This seminar will cover these pertinent aspects of vertical transportation machines:
· Elevators History from ancient to passenger, to freight, to parking, to helicopter, to special purpose, to exotic to proposed space elevators.
· Look at some known inventors.
· Elevator Drives and Functioning of various types of elevators.
· Building Codes and Federal Regulations regarding Elevators.
· Elevator installation planning guide for Architects and Engineers.

CE 199 Vertical Transportation Machines: (Elevators, Cranes, Derricks, & Hoists) Pt.2
This seminar will cover these pertinent aspects of vertical transportation machines:
· Elevators, Cranes, Derricks, Hoists and Conveyors.
· Anatomy of non-elevator lifting equipment.
· Accessories for lifting equipment and regulations, e.g. chains, ropes, sheaves, baskets, buckets, etc.
· OSHA and other related regulations.
· Closing Remarks.

CE-200 Principles and Design of Concrete and Clay Masonry (Pt. #2)
This course is an extension of Part 1 that provides advanced Design & Construction Inspection parameters & best practices to increase your technical effectiveness in these to a superior degree.
The specific subjects covered are:
· Flashing installation
· Hybrid masonry design
· Efflorescence causes & control
· Masonry testing procedures
· Masonry water repellents
· Structural clay tile design bases for retrofitting or rehabing existing buildings
· Masonry earthquake response and mitigations
· Floor & wall tile installation
· Autoclaved aerated concrete precast masonry

CE-201 Sustainable Urban Infrastructure Systems (Pt #1)
Effective planning for sustainable urban infrastructure systems reflects an understanding of:  1.) basic processes and system features 2.) current trends in, say, energy use and fuel sources 3.) financing options and limitations and 4.) system interdependencies and vulnerabilities. This seminar will provide an overview of transportation, water resources and energy infrastructure and by addressing issues such as these it will provide the practicing engineer with a deeper understanding of the challenges confronting stewards of the built environment. Part -1- of a two-part series will cover transportation and water systems and include the following topics: a.) transportation and urban development b.) traffic congestion and alternatives to new road construction such as congestion pricing and intelligent transportation systems b.) high speed rail challenge in the US  c.) water concepts such as “virtual water” d.) water purification and distribution process.

CE-202 Sustainable Urban Infrastructure Systems (Pt #2)
Effective planning for sustainable urban infrastructure systems reflects an understanding of:  1.) basic processes and system features 2.) current trends in, say, energy use and fuel sources 3.) financing options and limitations and 4.) system interdependencies and vulnerabilities.  This seminar will provide an overview of transportation, water resources and energy infrastructure and by addressing issues such as these it will provide the practicing engineer with a deeper understanding of the challenges confronting stewards of the built environment. Part -2- of a two-part series will cover wastewater and energy systems and include the following topics: a.) wastewater treatment process b.) electricity generation, transmission and distribution process c.) energy challenges with respect to supply, security and climate change  d.) system vulnerabilities with the electric grid as an example e.) sustainable practices.

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CE-203 Geotechnical Engineering (Pt. 1)
This seminar will cover the following physical characteristics and geotechnical properties of the soil:

Soil properties consist of grain size analysis, void ratio, porosity, relative density, Atterberg Limits, hydrometer test.

  • Subsurface investigation, drilling & sampling, and soil classification.
  • Soil shear strength:
    • Unconfined Compression.
    • Triaxial Shear Test.
    • Direct Shear Test
  • Compressibility of the soil:
    • Concept of Consolidation.
    • Consolidation Test.
    • Settlement Analysis.

CE-204 Geotechnical Engineering (Pt. 2)
This seminar will cover  compaction and soil stabilization:

  • General concept of soil stabilization, soil compaction, laboratory and field soil compaction.
  • Excavation and hauling, borrow material for compaction, suitability of borrow material for compaction.
  • Excavation and compaction equipment.
  • Concept of Underpinning and Sheeting/Shoring
  • Temporary dewatering and discussion of French Drain, Sump Pump and Water Proofing Membrane.

CE-205 Cold Weather Concreting
This course focuses on preventing concrete freezing damage at early ages after placement. It shows how to assure that concrete develops required strength for safe form/shore removal. Maintaining curing conditions that foster normal strength development w/o excessive heat is reviewed, as well as, limiting rapid temp change so that no thermal cracking occurs. Maturity factor, quality control, cold weather super-plasticizers, cold resistant concrete and worker safety in cold weather, including hypothermia & frostbite recognition, prevention & treatment are also covered.

CE-206 Hot Weather Concreting
This course reviews best practices & regulations for placing, finishing & curing concrete in hot weather. It includes the use of admixtures & cementitious additives & introduces basic concrete chemistry. Control of plastic shrinkage cracking & how it is related to relative humidity is reviewed. Batching & delivery control is presented as well as different admixture dosing & cementitious additives. Placement strategies are gone over in detail, along with finishing & curing practices.

CE-207A & CE-207B: Ten Hour OSHA Construction Outreach Course for Engineers for Engineers and Architects
Construction sites are inherently dangerous.  Any individual visiting and/or inspecting construction projects should have a general awareness of hazardous working conditions during construction activities.

This course, sponsored by the “OSHA Outreach Training Program for the Construction Industry” provides training for workers and employers on the recognition, avoidance, abatement, and prevention of safety and health hazards in workplaces in the construction industry. The program also provides information regarding workers' rights, employer responsibilities, and how to file a complaint.

Many local governments (i.e. New York City and State) require that all workers performing public construction projects possess a 10 hour card.  In addition, many agencies (i.e. NYC Department of Design and Development) have similar requirements.

The course will be given in two five hour parts, (Day 1 & Day 2)

CE-207A "OSHA" Ten (10 hour) Construction Safety Certification for Engineers (Day #1)
Day #1 will include lectures and activities relating to an “Introduction to OSHA”, “Cranes, Derricks, Hoists, Elevators & Conveyers”, “Excavations”, “Materials Handling, Storage, Use and Disposal”, “Tools – Hand and Power”, and “Hazard Communication”. 

CE-207B "OSHA" Ten (10 hour) Construction Safety Certification for Engineers (Day #2)
Day #2 will include lectures and activities relating to the following “OSHA Focus Four Hazards”: Falls, Electrocution, Struck-By (e.g. falling objects, trucks, cranes), Caught-In or between (e.g. trench hazards, equipment). We will wrap up part B with “Personal Protective Equipment”.

CE-208 NYC Waste Water Treatment Plants (Pt. 1)
This Seminar will discuss some of the problem areas in New York City Wastewater Treatment Plants. There will be several handouts for each Seminar (Wastewater Treatment Plant Capacities and locations; Stainless Steel in Wastewater Treatment Plants; Ductile Iron Pipe Products; Protector 401 Ceramic epoxy lining; NFPA 820 - sample; Submergence depth of suction piping required to prevent Vortexing). This seminar will cover some of the following areas:
1.  Combined sewer design
2.  Regulator control
3.  Balancing of flow
4.  Grit removal systems
5.  Grease removal systems
6.  Main Sewage pump and piping design
7.  Screening pumps
8.  Miscellaneous Tropics

CE-209 NYC Waste Water Treatment Plants (Pt. 2)
This seminar will cover some of the basic and fundamental design of the headwork's of a New York City Wastewater Treatment Plant.  The headwork's is the area of the Plant that starts from the main influent gate to the Influent Channel of the Primary Settling Tank.  There will be several handouts for each Seminar (Wastewater Treatment Plant Capacities and locations; Stainless Steel in Wastewater Treatment Plants; Ductile Iron Pipe Products; Protector 401 Ceramic epoxy lining; NFPA 820 - sample; Submergence depth of suction piping required to prevent Vortexing). This Seminar will cover some of the following topics:
1.  Main Influent Gate & Actuator Control
2.  Stop Log system
3.  Balancing of flow
4.  Grit Settling Tanks
5.  Screening Systems
6.  Wet Well Design
7.  Main Sewage Pump
8.  Main Sewage Pump Discharge Piping
9.  Influent Channel to Primary Settling Tank

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CE-210 NYC Waste Water Treatment Plants (Pt. 3)
This Seminar will cover the designs and operation and maintenance of Primary Settling Tanks, Aeration Tanks and Final Settling Tanks in a New York City Wastewater Treatment Plant. There will be several handouts for each Seminar  (Wastewater Treatment Plant Capacities and locations; Stainless Steel in Wastewater Treatment Plants; Ductile Iron Pipe Products; Protector 401 Ceramic epoxy lining; NFPA 820 - sample; Submergence depth of suction piping required to prevent Vortexing). This seminar will cover the following topics:
1.  Primary Settling Tank
2.  Primary Settling Tank Pumps and Piping
3.  Aeration Tank
4.  PST & FST components
5.  Skimming Systems

CE-211 NYC Waste Water Treatment Plants (Pt. 4)
This seminar will cover the Thickening, Digester and Gas Holder designs in a New York City Wastewater Treatment Plant. There will be several handouts for each Seminar (Wastewater Treatment Plant Capacities and locations; Stainless Steel in Wastewater Treatment Plants; Ductile Iron Pipe Products; Protector 401 Ceramic epoxy lining; NFPA 820 - sample; Submergence depth of suction piping required to prevent Vortexing). This seminar will cover the following topics:
1.  Thickener
2.  Digester
3.  Gas Holder
4.  Loop System
5.  Waste Gas Burner
6.  Wards Island Plant Tour Photographs

CE-212 Special Inspections for Multi-level Commercial Buildings (Pt.1)
This seminar describes: (1) The Non-destructive testing (NDT) of fillet and full penetration structural welds. It includes the liquid penetration and magnetic particle tests for surface examination as well as ultrasonic tests   and radiography for groove welds that include high pressure steam pipe welds at various locations including the United Nations and Lincoln Center. (2) Various types of Fire Alarm Tests are described and shown such as Manual Pull, Smoke Detector, Duct Detector and Water Flow Tests. The response to these tests are light and siren strobe reactions, damper fans, and in some cases doors opening and closing at La Guardia Airport and other locations.  Procedures and reports with photos are included.

CE-213 Special Inspections for Multi-level Commercial Buildings (Pt.2)
This seminar describes: (1)The hydrostatic testing of new and modified sprinkler systems. (2) The testing of old sprinkler systems using NFPA-25 procedure to evaluate the operating condition of the sprinklers.  The results may lead to replacement of the sprinkler system. (3) The   implementation of the new Energy Code Compliance through special inspection that is specified in TR8 (Task Responsibility 8) in New York City building erection and modification at The Barclay Arena in Brooklyn and other locations. This inspection includes the HVAC systems and electrical power sources for internal and external lighting. Reports with photos are included.

CE-214 Structural Steel Repair and Erection (Pt.1)
This course improves the Field Engineers’ understanding & oversight of steel repair and erection tasks through the application of Quality & Safety Assurance techniques. Lessons learned for both elevated and underground structural repair are studied & discussed. Topics include: field measurements; rivet removal; high strength bolt peculiarities; column splice deficiencies; unapproved foreign bolts; web stiffener & top flange replacement; sliding plate & rocker pin expansion joints; & column bas repair.

CE-215 Structural Steel Repair and Erection (Pt.2)
This course is an extension of Part I and expands on the Engineers’ knowledge of steel repair & erection. It includes: lateral bracing repair; the correct & incorrect methods of temporary posting; introduction to welding; new steel erection; tower crane types and hazards; high strength bolt installation including turn of the nut method; OSHA requirements for a steel erection plan.

CE-216 Suspension Bridge, Basics Concepts & Structural Evaluation (Part #1)
This presentation will mentions about basic Concepts in the field of suspension bridges. A suspension bridge is a special type of bridge in which loads from the bridge deck are carried by vertical suspenders that are supported by suspension cables suspended between towers and anchored at both ends of the bridge. Suspension bridges are showing signs of distress due to aging and improper repair or rehabilitation or lack of proper maintenance. Normally visual inspections (including 100% hands on inspection of fracture critical fatigue prone details) are done for structural evaluation of critical components of a suspension bridge. Extending the service life of aging suspension bridges is very important for the transportation industry. Proper Non-Destructive Testing (NDT) can identify most of the structural problems. Thereafter, necessary repair/rehabilitation can be executed with minimum funding. This presentation will mention existing/new structural evaluation techniques of suspension bridges based on author’s personal structural evaluation experience of high-rise suspension bridges

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CE-217 Suspension Bridge, Basics Concepts & Structural Evaluation (Part #2)
This presentation mentions about advanced concepts in the field of suspension bridges. Structural failure of a suspension bridge may be a combination of poor design, construction, maintenance, failure to inspect fracture critical and fatigue prone details thoroughly, severe weather conditions or a combination of all these factors. Suspension bridges are more susceptible to vibration due to flexibility compared to other rigid bridges. In design, there are variations in the type of vehicular and railroad live load. The dynamic effect by railroad traffic is more significant than vehicular traffic on a suspension bridge. Railroad traffic can be allowed on suspension bridge under specific circumstances. This presentation contains rail specific information that is relevant to structural evaluation of suspension bridges carrying railroad traffic and or vehicular traffic. This presentation will mention existing/new structural evaluation techniques of suspension bridges based on author’s personal structural evaluation experience of high-rise suspension bridges.

CE-218 Sewer Design & Maintenance for Residential & Commercial Buildings (Pt. 1)
This seminar will present a brief historical overview of New York City’s sewer system, how it was designed and built. It will present an overview of the drainage plan design methodology, from inception to capital funding for a new sewer. Included are examples of solutions to novel or unusual problems..

CE-219 Sewer Design & Maintenance for Residential & Commercial Buildings (Pt. 2)
After a sewer is built it will require maintenance during its life. This seminar presents an overview of the maintenance procedures. Throughout the lecture anecdotal references will be made to errors discovered on sewers. Further, examples of problems encountered and how they were resolved will be presented.

CE-220 Ground Water, Seepage, and Wells at Constructiont
This seminar will introduce the basics of groundwater sources and flow. Included will be some general facts and concepts concerning groundwater movement. A study of groundwater movement utilizing piezometers and observation wells will be presented. There will be a discussion of the permeability of groundwater movement via standard permeability tests. Well hydraulics will be addressed particularly with regards to well water discharge capacity in confined and unconfined aquifers.

CE-221 Excavation and Dewatering for Construction Sites
This seminar will address trench excavation and study various types of excavation failure modes. Also presented will be soil types and the pressure they exert in effecting slope failure. There will also be a discussion of standard procedures, for residential and commercial sites, with regards to excavation protection methods to prevent slope failure as well as how to install and remove these protective systems at the excavation sites.

CE-222 Quality Control & Quality Assurance at Construction Sites (Part #1)
The focus of this course is to clarify the quality requirements and responsibilities for both the Contractor and the Owner’s representatives during the construction life of a capital project, based on the International Standards Organization’s (ISO) framework, which can be used to assure the successful management of any business. The course explains not only WHAT is required to successfully implement 13 ISO Management Elements, but also HOW those processes can be practically achieved in the field, as well as presenting EXAMPLES of good QC end-products. This results in the elimination of the often grinding conflict between maintaining the project schedule & giving the Owner a quality project that both parties can be proud of while maximizing the Contractor’s profitability.

CE-223 Quality Control & Quality Assurance at Construction Sites (Part #2)
The course also shows how to encourage the efficient and effective performance of the Quality Control responsibilities of the Contractor and the Quality Assurance responsibilities of the Owner’s representatives. This is achieved by facilitating the Contractor’s progress and making certain that the specified level of quality is delivered, which gets the job done right the first time, and minimizes punch-lists & call-backs. Small group exercises are included, as time permits, to imprint these methods on the mind so that the course information is ready to be used the next day, on the job.

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CE-224 NYC Zoning for Commercial & Residential Buildings (Pt #1)
This seminar will explore the history of zoning development in New York City. It discusses how along with Zoning Analysis, NYC Building Code Analysis is a must.  Using a specific building as an example, of residential and commercial/mixed use, this type of buildings shall be analyzed.  Will discuss how typical zoning analysis should be presented by performing zoning calculations.  Discussions will include 3D sketches and Zoning information required on the  DOB Form ZD1.

CE-225 NYC Zoning for Commercial & Residential Buildings (Pt #2)
This seminar will take a Commercial/Mixed Use Zoning Building Example and develop Zoning Calculations.  It will also develop the accompanying Building Code Calculations.  There will be a discussion of  Fire Ratings for  different Building Elements and how to achieve required the required fire ratings.  There will also be a discussion of the  various aspects of Egress Analysis that must be developed along with Building Code Analysis.  We will finally discuss some typical Plan Examiner “Objections” and how to respond to their inquiries.

CE-226 The Underpinning of Foundations (Pt. #2)
Part 2 begins with Jacked pile installation and the method of using pretest piles to reduce the subsequent settlement of these types of piles. It then focuses on ground freezing and pressure grout injection such s permeation grouting and jet grouting. From there it will review soil nailing and reinforced earth, before moving on to micro-piles, both standard as well as reticulated. Drilling techniques are discussed, such as continuous flight auger, tri-cone, rotary-percussive, down the hole hammer, and helical types. Finally, Jet grouting is studied in detail to provide a fully rounded view of these latest soil supporting systems.

CE-227 Forensic Engineering Analysis for Litigation (Part #3)
The owner of a house in Buffalo requesting failure analysis of copper sink parts led to litigation against the insurance company.  A woman broke her ankle from falling off a substandard ladder in a museum; this accident led to litigation.  To avoid water main failures, a U.S. pipe society provided methods to properly install water mains.  Modes of water main break failures were illustrated.  Failure Analyses of water main breaks in Hackensack, N.J. and 135th street in Manhattan are also included.  Correlation of the brittle nature of steel hulled ships and steel water mains is reviewed.  The cause of a house explosion in Long Island is determined. .

CE-228 Forensic Engineering Analysis for Litigation (Part #4)
A fuel oil spill in Long Island resulted in the failure analysis of copper tubing which was the cause, but was not allowed by the judge.  A welder injured during tack welding sued, because the weld electrodes were either not proper or properly prepared before welding.  A private firm has issued an alleged cause of water main breaks.  Failure analysis of different water main breaks are presented, with the latest revised New York City method of procedure for failure analysis of water main breaks revealed.

CE-229 Reinforcing Steel and Concrete Inspection (Pt. #2)
Avoiding Concrete Surface Imperfections & How to Fix Them
This course reviews how to eliminate concrete surface imperfections by: Identifying them, Describing their causes, Suggesting methods of prevention
Pointing out ways to correct them.
The types of imperfections that will be analyzed and discussed in detail are:
Crazing, Dusting, Crusting, Flaking, Scaling, Blistering, Honeycombing, Pop-outs, Cracking, and Rebar Corrosion

CE-230 Engineering Economics in Estimating the Cost of Projects (#1)
The seminar will explore concepts, methods and procedures, used in construction cost estimating.  The estimate role in successful project delivery and administration will be discussed.  Participants will understand the type of cost estimates and the appropriate use of each.  The bid process and bidders strategy will be reviewed and discussed.  The seminar’s objective is to emphasize importance of construction cost estimating for overall project success.

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CE-231 Engineering Economics in Estimating the Cost of Projects (#2)
Construction project cost estimating is not an exact science.  However, estimators are expected to create reasonable, profitable and competitive project cost estimates. These costs must address much more than just labor and materials. It must qualify and address project risks, schedule, working hours, environmental issues, overhead spending, escalation and any other costs which may affect the complete project cost. An overall objective of the course is to maximize participant’s professional potential and increase effectiveness of construction cost estimates.

CE-232 Introduction to Intelligent Transportation Systems (Pt.1)
Intelligent transportation systems (ITS) improve transportation safety and mobility through the application of information and communication technologies into the transportation infrastructure and in-vehicle. In Part-1, a brief introduction of ITS will be provided including the national and regional ITS architecture and the user services for the national ITS architecture. It will then introduce the function of traffic management center in controlling traffic; tools and technologies used in collecting data/information, tolling and disseminating real time multimodal travel and parking information.

CE-233 Introduction to Intelligent Transportation Systems (Pt.2)
Intelligent transportation systems (ITS) improve transportation safety and mobility through the application of information and communication technologies into the transportation infrastructure and in-vehicle. In part-2, active traffic management strategies/techniques will be introduced toward a more efficient utilization of existing capacity; it will also introduce vehicle technologies (safety features), national ITS deployment issues including ITS deployment challenges (barriers) as well as next generation ITS including the progresses in connected vehicle research and deployment.

CE-234 Construction Safety Engineering and Site Audits (Pt. 1)
This Course includes the identification and engineering evaluation of key risk factors for construction operations, and the preplanning of engineered strategies to mitigate and control these hazards. Topics include evaluation of high profile risks of Demolition, Excavation, Elevated work areas, Marine and bridge work, Heavy equipment operations, Steel Erection and Crane Operations Working in Petroleum and Chemical Processing Facilities, Work Zone Traffic Control and the MUTCD. The focus is on Preplanning and Safety Engineering of High Hazard Construction Operations.

CE-235 Construction Safety Engineering and Site Audits (Pt. 2)
Part Two covers current techniques of site safety engineering audits and inspections to support successful implementation of hazard identification and control strategies on construction projects.Topics include field audits, accident investigation,and use of computer applications to acquire and evaluate data. Focus is on field auditing of high hazard operations such as  Steel Erection and Crane Operations,Excavation and Trenching,Demolition, Working in Petroleum and Chemical Processing Facilities,Marine Exposures,Heavy Equipment and Fleet Operations,Mitigation of Losses due to Falls from Heights.

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CE-236 Technical Writing for Engineering Proposals and Projects (#1)
This course will provide details on written products which engineers are expected to prepare as part of their professional responsibilities.  We will cover various components of technical reports, such as: document design; tables; figures or diagrams; citations, appendices, and accrediting; basic rules for writing clearly; crafting strong executive summaries, abstracts and conclusions/recommendations.   Various types of work products, such as transmittal letters and technical reports will be reviewed.   Instruction will include: description of the structure, organization and elements of technical reports; methods for ensuring proper grammar, spelling and punctuation; the importance of proofreading and editing; adjusting the content to the anticipated audience; and time management.  Attendees may bring current or past reports (redacted if necessary) to be shared with the group for discussion if time permits. 

CE-237 Technical Writing for Engineering Proposals and Projects (#2)
Proposal writing fundamentals will be addressed in this class.  Detailed information on writing proposals will be delivered in this course, including: understanding and breaking down the elements of the Request for Proposal or Request for Qualifications; preparation of a response; ascertaining evaluation criteria and weighting factors; types of proposal documents; adjusting the content to the anticipated audience; production requirements; and time management.  This course will include various components of proposals, such as: proposal layout and organization; tables; figures or diagrams; appendices; forms; basic rules for writing clearly; and crafting strong executive summaries.  Bring a current or past proposal (redacted if necessary) along with the RFP and any amendments to be shared with the group for evaluation, recommendations and potential trouble-shooting, if time permits. 

CE-238 The Highs & Lows of the Scaffolding Safety Regulations (Pt.1)
OSHA’s scaffold safety standard requires employees who perform work while on a scaffold be trained to recognize hazards associated with the type of scaffolding used and to understand procedures to control or minimize hazards. This course is designed as a model training program to satisfy the standard’s training requirements. Topics include hazards from falls, being struck by falling objects, electrical hazards, access, proper use of scaffolds, proper handling of materials on scaffolds, and maximum intended loads of scaffolds. This class will focus on the basic safety requirements of scaffold usage and supported scaffold requirements.

CE-239 The Highs & Lows of the Scaffolding Safety Regulations (Pt.2)
OSHA’s scaffold safety standard requires employees who perform work while on a scaffold be trained to recognize hazards associated with the type of scaffolding used and to understand procedures to control or minimize hazards. This course is designed as a model training program to satisfy the standard’s training requirements. Topics include hazards from falls, being struck by falling objects, electrical hazards, access, proper use of scaffolds, proper handling of materials on scaffolds, and maximum intended loads of scaffolds. This class will focus on the unique requirements of hung scaffolding and other specialty scaffolding.

CE-240 Ethics for Practicing Engineers (Part #3)
This course will explore three diverse areas of ethical challenges and opportunities facing the Professional Designer and offer paths toward successful accomplishment of these life-defining responsibilities in today's environment.
The first area will focus on basic issues of creating plans and specifications for projects to be constructed, or while working in the manufacturing field while resolving potential conflicts that arise between the technical and the business goals.
 The second area will explore overseeing construction as the Owner’s Representative or managing as the Contractor’s PM, assuring the facility is built to the standards set forth in the contract while bringing the project in within budget.
The National Society of Professional Engineers’ Code of Ethics will act as a base line in defining the professional's level of responsibility. This base line will then be expanded using an outline of moral codes developed by our earliest philosophers and modern business thinkers.
Practical advice is given in creating ethical business relationships with Contactors as well as the ethical “fair& reasonable” interpretations of a contract.
The third area will look at special concerns for the volunteer professional who donates time after a disaster, along with the various possible legal and ethical ramifications that must be taken into account..

CE-241 Ethics for Practicing Engineers (Part #4)
This course will discuss broader implications that involves a review of the lessons learned from the Fukushima accident and the global assumptions developed from that disaster which must be considered when designing any large project.
The ethical responsibility each of us has for identifying and creating our own best selves is analyzed within the context of leadership and management styles that enhance dealing effectively with followers and staff.  To assure this wider perspective is understood, an analysis is performed of the types of long-term ethical considerations that should be kept in mind in the face of today’s accelerating technological changes

CE-242 The Applications and Flexibility of Shot Concrete (Pt.1)
Introduction will explain Shot Concrete vs. Shotcrete vs. Gunite. A history and timeline of developments in this field will be presented. Various Codes and Specifications applicable to shot concrete will be discussed. A detailed inventory of shot concrete Applications will be explored. Then the equipment used in various applications of shot concrete or Gunite will be looked at and merits and application of each piece of equipment discussed..

CE-243 The Applications and Flexibility of Shot Concrete (Pt.2)
Video clips of shot concrete for various applications ranging from tunnels to bridge repairs will be presented. Then the merits of Dry Mix vs. Wet Mix will be explored. To achieve various design objectives, different techniques of placement of shot concrete will be explained. Nowadays Shot concrete may frequently be used as fiber reinforced concrete. Design and applications of fiber reinforced shot concrete will be explored. Finally, various techniques for testing of shot concrete for different applications will be presented.

CE-244 Open Channel Flow Characteristics for Wastewater Systems
During this seminar you will learn fundamental concepts of open channel hydraulics with focus on design of storm water systems, flood control channels and roadway culverts. We will explore different types of open channel flows and will discuss principles of open channel design including concepts like Hydraulic Jump. The course will conclude with example problems that will be solved and reviewed in a group setting and that will require the use of the most important equations in Open Channels: Bernoulli, continuity and Manning.

CE-245 Closed Conduit Flow Characteristics for Wastewater Systems
This seminar will focus on fundamentals of closed conduit hydraulics including integral relations between conservation of mass, momentum, and moment of momentum. We will introduce pipe networks, pressure flows and hydraulic machines and will conduct analysis of transient conduit flow including pressure fluctuation and water hammer. The course will conclude with example problems that will be solved and reviewed in a group setting.

CE-246 Building Security Hardening & Blast Resistant Design (Pt.1)
This seminar presents planning, scope development and design criteria that focus on security threats and methods to either prevent their occurrence or mitigate their effects.In this part blast effects are analyzed and comparisons are made with various levels of explosions as a base from design decisions can be made. Overall strategies are discussed concerning standoff distances, prevention of building collapse, minimizing flying debris, effective building layouts and limiting airborne contamination. A risk-tier system is presented that organizes buildings into low, medium and high categories by threat, vulnerability and impact levels with recommendations for medium and high tier..

CE-247 Building Security Hardening & Blast Resistant Design (Pt.2)
This seminar presents planning, scope development and design criteria that focus on security threats and methods to either prevent their occurrence or mitigate their effects.This seminar addresses building systems such as facades, fenestrations, exterior walls and non-structural elements. The design portion will comprise a major portion of the course time and will introduce various concepts of blast design essential for preventing progressive building collapse. Local and National standards so the designer can have confidence in the design choices.

CE-248 Cement & Concrete Acceptance
This seminar reveals the sugar solubility and X-ray diffraction methods that were used for Portland cement acceptance criteria up to 1980 and presently. The cement elements are presented in detail. It also discusses the design mix and addition of different size aggregates in the concrete. Testing methods of concrete cylinders required by The American Concrete Institute as well as Concrete Field Sampling and Flow Cone Test procedures are reviewed.

CE-249 Use of Strain Gages & Nitinol
This seminar explains the use of strain gages to obtain test results of forces and pressures in various ways, underwater forces on closing gates at the Cannonsville, N.Y. Reservoir, as well as design testing for water tunnel valves and shaft caps were performed with strain gages. In addition, Nitinol and other NiTi alloys are shown to possess shape memories at room and higher or lower temperatures. This has been proven to be useful in many situations including as bone plates for healing acceleration.

CE-250 Tunnel Life Cycle Design & Cost Analysis (Part #1)
Numerous tunnels in the United States are more than 50 to 100 years old and are showing signs of considerable deterioration, e.g. water infiltration and other structural defects.  When making funding decisions of tunnel projects under constrained budgets, it is tempting to place a higher importance on up-front costs and pay insignificant attention to future costs.  Tunnel Life Cycle Cost Analysis (TLCCA) is a data-driven tool that provides a detailed account of project costs over its expected life. The various topics covered are purpose of this presentation e.g. global transportation (highway and railroad) industry problems; choice of highway & railroad tunnels vs. bridges; infrastructure life: underground vs. above-ground; history of US highway & railroad tunnels; commonly used highway & railroad tunnel terminology / what is a tunnel highway & railroad tunnel; design basis and specifications of highway & railroad tunnel project; choice of the highway & railroad tunnel system; rehabilitation of highway & railroad tunnel structure elements; highway and railroad tunnel water infiltration rate;  consequences of water infiltration in highway and railroad tunnel; highway and railroad tunnel leak remediation methods; highway & railroad tunnel liner types; basic types of highway & railroad tunnel construction in common use; cut and cover: bottom up & top down methods; need, applications & features of life cycle cost analysis (LCCA). The structural degradation of tunnel takes place in due course of time. Water infiltration is the most common cause of deterioration. Water infiltration is detrimental to the life of a tunnel. The three alternatives for remediation of a water infiltration problem are: Short term repairs, long term repairs or, as a last resort, reconstruct all or portions of the tunnel lining that is causing the problem using methods of waterproofing that incorporate newer technologies. Need of LCCA is required when making project funding decisions. The various transportation companies saved hundreds of millions of dollars by not investing in a project that was not worth the full cost using LCCA. The various other details will follow in tunnel life cycle design & cost analysis-part two.

CE-251 Tunnel Life Cycle Design & Cost Analysis (Part #2)
Life cycle cost analysis is a dynamic process. Some ongoing tunnel projects are not as successful as they initially appeared in the planning stage because only design and construction costs were included without taking into consideration the long-term costs associated with maintenance, operation, etc. The various topics covered are life-cycle cost model; various costs of LCCA; life cycle cost methodology; present worth & annualized method; discounting factors formula; maximizing the infrastructure investment values using LCCA; limitations of LCCA and future work for up-gradation of highway & railroad tunnel technology. One of the model of LCC can be expressed as LCC (life cycle cost) = IC + OP + FC; where IC = initial cost, OP = operating cost, and FC = failure cost. This model refers to the failure cost as these costs incurred when the system is not in its normal state of performance. Also, the risk and vulnerability of a system can be included in this model. There are two method of LCCA i.e. present worth & annualized method. The present worth method attempts to bring all of the present and future costs of a given option to present day values. The annualized method is used to transform present and future costs into a uniform annual expense. LCCA has its limitations because of advancement of technology, the current knowledge may not be applicable toward the end of the tunnel life-cycle period. In spite of these limitations, TLCCA, using data based on innovative research on existing and new tunnel projects, enables decision makers (planners, designers, maintainers) to select the most appropriate tunnel improvement alternatives. With the increasing pace of changes in the technology and the current economic down turn, organizations around the world are focused more on cost-effective and value-added technology/research in the field of advancement of tunnel technology. A broad level of research with adequate funding could be initiated down the road to develop new techniques in design, construction and maintenance of tunnels by using LCCA and other techniques (including risk analysis and operation research principles)..

CE-252 Examining the Causes & Cures of Structural Failures (Pt. 1)
Using the case method, the study of structural failures and how they can best be prevented using concepts and experience as a guide to enable you to enter into the dialog and offer your own education and experience to broaden the minds of fellow design professions.  Moreover, by looking at key points in the design, code requirements, and ethics surrounding the construction process, the professional will be better equipped to solve problems going forward in all phases of a project from preliminary design through final documents.  You will both give and take away valuable information through the discussion, questions, answers, comments, and legal provisions that affect us all.  

CE-253 Examining the Causes & Cures of Structural Failures (Pt. 2)
Here, the case study method gets into full swing with in-depth review of how the collapse occurred, and in some instances, the aftermath of the failure.  Cases such as Washington Roebling’s evaluation of failures led to some of the lasting and newer technologies including the cable stay bridges of today help present day designers move to improved designs and methods that greatly enhance the lives of everyone involved.  Moreover, simple white-board details highlighting the key elements being discussed give class participants an opportunity to create an impression of the engineering concepts that they can think about long after the course is given..

CE-254 Engineering Measures for Quick Disaster Recovery (Pt 1)
To Be Added.

CE-255 Engineering Measures for Quick Disaster Recovery (Pt 2)
To Be Added.

CE-256 Effective Engineering & Design Analysis: Factors & Tools (Pt 1)
To Be Added

CE-257 Effective Engineering & Design Analysis: Factors & Tools (Pt 2)
To Be Added

 

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